DefCon is now on FaceBook.

Defending Contending has finally joined the world of social networking. We are now on Facebook and you can ‘friend’ us here.

Book Review: “The Robber’s Cave” by Charlotte Maria Tucker.

the-robbers-cave Yet another fine book from the Lamplighter Series of Rare Books. Written in 1887 by Charlotte Maria Tucker under the alias of A.L.O.E. (A Lady of England), The Robber’s Cave is a good read for all ages. It is suspenseful, reflective, and entertaining. Furthermore, Tucker is not afraid to show Roman Catholicism (the religion practiced by the book’s antagonists) as the idol-dependent false religion that it is.

The hills of Calabria, Italy are home to bands of nefarious thieves, but a single light can shine so brilliant in the darkest places. Why would a talented, skilled, and very innocent believer dwell purposefully with the cruelest villains? Perhaps you will learn the answer as you get to know Rafael, the Improvisatore. Ungrateful Horace Cleveland gains the answer to this question under the harshest of circumstances. The unfortunate opportunity is given to young Horace to learn the true value of things lost that he had taken so much for granted.

You can purchase this book at Family Faith Books.

Book review: “Titus: Comrade of the Cross” by Florence Morse Kingsley.

titusThe 1997 Lamplighter book of the year, Titus: Comrade of the Cross, was originally written in 1894 by Florence M. Kingsley.

A fictional work weaving the lives of several people living in and around Jerusalem at the time of Jesus’ ministry and crucifixion, this novel brings life to those nameless individuals found in the Gospels. Learn (through the imagination of Kingsley) about the poor blind beggar given sight by the Messiah; read the story about the twelve year-old girl who was raised back to life by the great Physician; and discover who the two thieves on the cross were and how they got there on that fateful Friday.

Although the narration is in modern English, the dialogue between characters is in the style reminiscent of King James English. It causes folks like me who aren’t King James savvy to get bogged down ever so slightly during the dialogue, but not enough to ruin the story. It was a good read, very doctrinally sound, and a very refreshing fictional tale that stands out among the plethora of modern Christian fiction absent of that which glorifies the Lord.

You can purchase this book at Family Faith Books.

In 1894 the publisher of this book rewarded Florence Kingsley with $1,000 for writing a story that would set a child’s heart on fire for Jesus Christ. In six weeks the demand was so great, they printed 200,000 additional copies! The award-winning entry, Titus: A Comrade of the Cross, is provocative, full of suspense and drama. The story of Titus and his crippled brother climaxes at the foot of the cross, where the real hero is proclaimed. The most compelling moment is saved until the very end. It will take your breath away.

Book review: “Justification and Regeneration” by Charles Leiter.

I recently completed the book Justification and Regeneration by Charles Leiter (with a forward by Paul Washer). This was a great book that explained in the simplest of terms the difference between justification and regeneration in the life of a believer.

It’s a quick and easy read and I highly recommend this book, especially to those who struggle to understand the difference between justification and regeneration.

You can purchase the book from Monergism. Thanks to Tom Rayborn from Christ Church Alton for sending me this book.