Mormonism: Making gods out of sinners since 1830.

The following quote comes from the blog Lehi’s Library:

“So in our view it doesn’t matter one bit that a person sinned at some point in their existence prior to becoming a god. It doesn’t preclude the possibility of being divine, because atonement can be made and the sin can be totally eradicated. In this sense I think we have a much more robust doctrine of atonement than mainstream Christianity. Our view of atonement is powerful enough to make gods out of sinners, theirs isn’t. . . . It doesn’t frustrate our sense of existence to speculate that God the Father was once like us.”

I wish all Mormons were that candid.

Quotes (894)

The Pure in heart shall see God, those that hunger and thirst after righteousness shall be completely satisfied with the same, the peace-makers shall be called the sons of God. These second clauses in the beatitudes describe the essence of the final kingdom in which the reward will consist. They show, therefore, that the reward towards which Jesus points his followers is not something morally or spiritually indifferent, but the highest enjoyment of what here already constitutes the natural blessedness pertaining to the internal Kingdom. Thus the reward bears an organic relation to the conduct it is intended to crown.

– Geerhardus Vos

1862 – 1949

Defending, Contending – what?

I recently started reading K. Scott Oliphant’s new book, The Battle Belongs to the Lord. Chapter 2 is an examination of the book of Jude and the author does an excellent job of explaining what we (those who are redeemed by the blood of Christ) are to defend and why we are to do so. He also describes the people and the motivation of those who “crept in unnoticed” and pose a danger to the church.

The exegesis of Jude in worth the price of the book. Here’s a taste for your condiseration:

“Jude’s description of the enemies who have made their way into the church is illuminating. He does not describe them as merely worldly people. … They [are people who] know the tradition and can “speak the language.” … The reference to Korah would have been particularly stunning to Jude’s readers (see Numbers 16 and 26.) … To put it (Korah’s rebellion) in New Testament terms, Korah used his leadership position in the church to exalt himself and his own agenda.”

Reading this chapter reminded me of a 28 minute message from a dear brother, introducing Jude. Listen to this message, buy the book. Then you will have a better understanding – perhaps an initial understanding – of why it is important to contend for the faith and what that faith is.

What’s The Big Deal on Creation?

Many Christians point out that the word “day” in Genesis chapter one can mean something other than a 24-hour day and, therefore, the scientific view that the world is billions of years old can be reconciled to the Scriptures.

But how does one determine when the Hebrew word “yom” means a 24-hour day and when it means an undetermined length of time? As with all interpretation, context is key.

And, as with all Scripture, understanding the authority of God as the ultimate rule of interpretation of His Word and His creation is foundational to everything else.

 

 

In this hour long free video from Answers in Genesis, you will see how dangerous it is to play fast and loose with the Word of God and be taught why the “yom” must mean 24-hour day in Genesis chapter 1.

May the Lord God of Heaven be our guide – and not any snake who relies on human “wisdom” to cause us to question His Word.

Quotes (892)


For another thing, let us not expect too much from our own hearts here below. At our best we shall find in ourselves daily cause for humiliation, and discover that we are needy debtors to mercy and grace every hour. The more light we have, the more we shall see our own imperfection. Sinners we were when we began, sinners we shall find ourselves as we go on; renewed, pardoned, justified—yet sinners to the very last. Our absolute perfection is yet to come, and the expectation of it is one reason why we should long for heaven.

– J.C. Ryle

1816 – 1900

Is your Worldview based on the world?

Many professing Christians think man has more wisdom than God in determining how long the creation took. Of course, few people put it in those terms, but that is what it boils down to. Here’s an example.

What are the consequences of disbelieving in a literal 6 day creation? We deny the clear teaching of the Old and New Testament. Jesus taught (recorded in Mark 10:6) that man and woman were created in the beginning of creation – not after a long, long time.

And when we deny the clear teachings of the elementary things of Scripture, why should our children believe us or our pastors when they are taught about sin and deliverance from its consequences? If creation is reduced to a fairy tale, we have breached the foundation of God’s revelation to man. God stated out His special revelation to man with the words, “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.” Creation is important to Him – it ought to be to us.

For a few days, you can download a 40 minute video in which Ken Ham describes the importance of believing God’s Word – for you and the next generation. In it you will find out:

The next generation is already calling it quits on traditional church. Next Sunday, look around, two thirds of the young people in your church are already disengaged from the message they are hearing. And it’s not just happening on the nominal fringe; it’s happening in the most solid “Bible-believing” churches.

In this important DVD, Ken Ham discusses the profound cultural changes taking place in our Western world, as God’s Word is rejected and man’s fallible ideas are welcomed. Ken relates some of the shocking statistics presented in the book Already Gone that reveal the reasons why young people are leaving church and abandoning the faith of their parents.

The church is failing to give children real answers to their questions. We are losing our kids long before college. But this is far from a hopeless situation. Ken explains how we can fight back for our children, and what we can do to ground our children in the faith and prepare them for the challenges of the secular world.

HT to my good friend at PurposeDrivel

Gin and juice missionaries.

Here’s the opening to a great little article on a matter we’ve been lamenting for years:

Many Christians tend to hang out a lot with unsaved friends for the sake of  “winning” them to Christ. (Unsaved girlfriends, boyfriends, club-buddies, former smokin’-buddies, co-workers, etc.) They often say that their plan is to “let their light shine”.

They say that’s the reason why they meet co-workers at the sports bar; That’s the reason why they share shots.

I sincerely doubt that.

In all honesty,  I’ve seen very little gospel sharing. Just a whole lot of chillin’ and jokin’ around. But, if you ask a “gin & juice missionary” to  reconsider their approach, they’ll quickly quip:

Stop being religious! Didn’t Christ eat with tax-collectors and sinners??

Read the entire article here.

Sermon of the week: “Thou Shalt Not Covet” by Phil Johnson.

Your sermon of the week is Thou Shalt Not Covet by Phil Johnson. This is the next installment of Johnson’s series on the Ten Commandments that is being featured on DefCon every other week as your Sermon of the Week (on Thursdays).

Quotes (891)

Holiness has a mighty influence upon others. When this appears with power in the lives of Christians, it works mightily upon the spirits of men; it stops the mouths of the ungodly . . . . I am sure we have found, by woeful experience, that in these debauched times, when religion is so bespattered with frequent scandals, yes, a general looseness of professors, it is hard to get any to come into the net of the Gospel. . . . If they were but holy and exemplary, they would be as a repetition of the preacher’s sermon to the families and neighbors among whom they converse, and would keep the sound of his doctrine continually ringing in their ears.

– William Gurnall

1617 – 1679

Anti-theists all aflutter over a street sign.

No one can trample on the memories of fallen firefighters and spit in the face of their families quite like the anti-theists.

Now, I know that not all atheists are angry and walk around with a chip on their shoulder (some are actually pleasant to be around), but here is a classic example of why atheists have still not found broad acceptance among the populace.

Below are some morsels from a FoxNews article (found here) about what has anti-theists in a tizzy . . . this week:

A group of New York City atheists is demanding that the city remove a street sign honoring seven firefighters killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks because they say the sign violates the separation of church and state.

The street, “Seven in Heaven Way,” was officially dedicated last weekend in Brooklyn outside the firehouse where the firefighters once served. The ceremony was attended by dozens of firefighters, city leaders and widows of the fallen men.

“There should be no signage or displays of religious nature in the public domain,” said Ken Bronstein, president of New York City Atheists. “It’s really insulting to us.”

Never mind that your words and actions are insulting to everyone else.

Bronstein then shares this revelation:

“We’ve concluded as atheists there is no heaven and there’s no hell.”

Then Bronstein shows his sensitivity regarding the matter:

He was nonplussed over how his opposition to the street sign might be perceived – especially since the sign is honoring fallen heroes. “It’s irrelevant who it’s for,” Bronstein said. “We think this is a very bad thing.”

Of course we’ll never be told how it’s “a very bad thing.” 

Then the president of the American Atheists makes this statement:

David Silverman, president of American Atheists, agreed calling on the city to remove the sign. “It implies that heaven actually exists,” Silverman told Fox News Radio.

See, in Silverman’s world it’s ok to claim Heaven doesn’t exist but don’t you dare suggest otherwise.

“People died in 9/11, but they were all people who died, not just Christians. Heaven is a specifically Christian place. For the city to come up and say all those heroes are in heaven now, it’s not appropriate.”

I agree with this last sentence from Silverman, but for different reasons.

Now it’s time to muddy the waters:

“All memorials for fallen heroes should celebrate the diversity of our country and should be secular in nature. These heroes might have been Jews, they might have been atheists, I don’t know, but either way it’s wrong for the city to say they’re in heaven. It’s preachy.”

Don’t you think it would be important to find out if one of the seven firefighters was an atheist before taking up this cause? Not knowing reveals that you are driven by your agenda and facts don’t really matter.

Perhaps the seven firefighters comprised several beliefs. Maybe one was a Christian, one a Jew, one a Roman Catholic, one a Muslim, one a Mormon, one a Jehovah’s Witness, and one a Seventh-day Adventist. All of these believe in a Heaven. So if none of the seven were an atheist, then this whole argument is moot.

And believing the seven firefighters are in Heaven is “preachy” but declaring that there is no Heaven is not?

Also, how does one “celebrate the diversity of our country” and at the same same time “be secular in nature?” That’s called doublespeak.

And then there’s this interesting fact:

City leaders seemed dumbfounded by the atheists’ outrage because no one complained about the sign as it was going through a public approval process. “It’s unfortunate that they didn’t raise this as an issue while it was undergoing its public review either at the community board level or when it came before the City Council on their public agenda,” said Craig Hammerman, the district manager for Brooklyn Community Board 6.

Hammerman told Fox News Radio that the community was “solidly behind this proposal. Not a single person stood up to speak out against it. I think it’s a little late in the process for someone to be bringing this up now.”

That’s because they wanted the sign to be approved so they could protest it on a grander scale and get the publicity they so desperately seek. There would have been much less press if they protested the matter during the city council meetings.

“The patriotic and right thing to do is to obey our own law and to realize that we are a diverse nation, a melting pot full of different views,” Silverman added.

We’re a melting pot but don’t you dare reflect the religious part of that melting pot, because if the majority of religious views conflict with the minority of anti-religious views, by golly, it’s time to knock the pot over. So much for diversity, huh?

But the city has no intention of removing the sign. If that’s the case, Bronstein said he may consider a lawsuit.

Good for the city! What’s one more threat of a lawsuit? Muslims use threats of terrorism, anti-theists use threats of litigation. They’re both designed to cause terror in an attempt to destroy an enemy. I hope NYC stands up to these anti-theist threats as they do to the Islamic threats.

Bottom line, is it’s just a street sign. It’s not going to cause anyone to become a Christian nor is it going to alter the course our nation is currently on. In the grand scheme of things this sign is much to do about nothing and the anti-theists know it. They’re just using it to reach for another 15 minutes of fame.

The families of those seven firefighters are ok with the memorial, as well as the overwhelming majority of the city; the only ones with objections are a small band of anti-theists who seem to exist only to be a nuisance to others.

I’m still waiting for these atheists to muster up the courage to cackle and threaten lawsuits over the Islamic festival held every year in Dearborn, Michigan.

While I’m waiting, I think I’ll protest the signs in my city that are “anti-Christian.” Signs like First Street, Thurston Way, and Riverview Lane.

Worship Songs Compared.

DefCon touches on the issue of music and the Church from time to time; thanks to a recent article from The Watchman’s Bagpipes, this is one of those times.

Yesterday in church we sang some contemporary “worship” songs at the opening of service and closed with a traditional hymn.  Our church often mixes the old and the new, the trite and the meaty.  I want to show you the difference for what passes as “worship” songs today, compared to what used to be standard fare.  I will give them in the order we sang them, and I want you to read the lyrics with a discerning eye.

Read the entire article here.